Transferring LLC Membership Interests Part 3—Involuntary Transfers

An involuntary transfer of an LLC membership interest is just that—a transfer prompted by a creditor action or the occurrence of a triggering event outside of the member’s control. An individual or entity obtaining a membership interest as a result of an involuntary transfer usually cannot fully step into the shoes of the transferring member.

This statutory protection—often called a pick your partner provision—acts as a safeguard that provides LLC members with a certain amount of personal asset protection. For example, whereas the creditor of a corporate shareholder could reach and exercise shareholder rights to their full extent, the creditor of an LLC member can reach and exercise only the economic rights associated with membership interests—not the voting or management rights. The recipient of this type of membership interest is called an assignee.

Statutory Provisions – Creditor Action

If an LLC does not specify any transfer provisions, creditor actions are subject to state LLC laws. Each state, in its LLC statute, has provisions limiting what actions a creditor can take against an LLC member for personal debt. Depending on the state, the statutory remedies available to an LLC member’s personal creditors may include:

  • A charging order, which is a court order requiring the LLC to pay all the distributions due to the member-debtor from the LLC to the creditor.
  • A foreclosure on the member-debtor’s LLC ownership interest.
  • A court order to dissolve the LLC.

These remedies protect the other LLC members from the risk of having the creditor of a debtor-member step into the debtor-member’s place and share in the control of the LLC. To a varying degree, they also address the creditor’s right to satisfaction of the debt.

Transfer Provisions – Other Triggering Events

Transfer provisions are typically specified in the LLC’s operating agreement or in a separate buy-sell agreement. There may be some overlap with creditor actions, as these are often included as triggering events in the transfer provisions.

Examples of triggering events that can be specified in an LLC’s transfer provisions include the following:

  • A deceased member’s membership interest passes to a prohibited individual or entity
  • A member’s bankruptcy or other involuntary transfer of a membership interest to the member’s creditors
  • A member’s separation or divorce, or the transfer to a member’s spouse under property division or under a divorce or separation decree
  • A member’s membership interest becomes subject to a valid court order, levy, or other transfer that the LLC is required by law to recognize
  • A member’s breach of the LLC’s confidentiality
  • A member’s failure to comply with any mandatory provision of the operating agreement
  • A member’s failure to maintain a license or other qualification that disqualifies the member from engaging in the LLC’s primary business

If a triggering event occurs, the transfer provisions may prompt a mandatory redemption of the member’s membership interest or a right of first refusal to the LLC or to the other members. If an involuntary transfer does occur, the recipient of the membership interest—the assignee—typically receives only an economic interest in the LLC with no management or voting rights.

Transferring LLC Membership Interests Part 2—Voluntary Transfers

An LLC affords its members a certain amount of personal asset protection. Part of this protection hinges on the restricted transferability of LLC membership interests.  Restricted transferability protects the non-transferring members from creditors and unwelcome new members, which upholds the integrity and value of the non-transferring members’ membership interests.

  • Most (but not all) LLCs impose requirements or restrictions on the transfer of a member’s interest.
  • If the LLC’s operating agreement is silent on the transferability of interests, you must look to state law to be sure there are no default provisions restricting transferability.

This article, part 2 in a 3-part series, focuses on voluntary membership interest transfers done with the intent to grant full membership rights to the recipient.

Step 1 – Determine the Transfer Process

The LLC’s operating agreement should specify the process for transferring a membership interest. If the LLC has a buy-sell agreement in place, that must also be consulted.

  • Find the provisions that detail allowable transfers, the steps to complete them, and the method for calculating the value of the membership interest, if any.
  • The membership interests may be freely transferable but are likely subject to restrictions set forth in the operating agreement, the buy-sell agreement, or by state law.
  • Some transfers may be permitted without prior approval of the other members, such as transfers to a member’s immediate family or to a trust for the benefit of a member or a member’s immediate family.
  • The LLC or the other members may have a right of first refusal before a transfer can be made.

If the operating agreement or buy-sell agreement doesn’t specify the process for transferring a membership interest, you will have to look to state law. Once you determine the authority governing the transfer process—the operating agreement and buy-sell agreement or state law—be sure to note all requirements and restrictions.

Step 2 – Determine the Value

Calculate the value of your membership interest. If the operating agreement or a separate buy-sell agreement doesn’t address this, you will have to work with the other LLC members to determine and agree upon the value of the membership interest.

Step 3 – Follow Transfer Process

Complete the LLC transfer process as determined in Step 1. Make sure you follow all requirements. For example, if the operating agreement requires the unanimous written consent of all LLC members (a common requirement), meet with all of the LLC members to obtain their written consent.

Step 4 – Obtain or Draft the Transfer Document

 If the LLC does not have a standard transfer document, you will need to draft a transfer document.

  • Check the operating agreement or state law to determine what the transfer document must include.
  • Typically, it must include the transferor’s name, the LLC’s name, the recipient’s name, and the percentage of the membership interest being transferred.
  • If a form is not provided by the LLC, note that the form of the transfer document is usually subject to the LLC’s approval; make sure to obtain this approval if necessary.

 Step 5 – Execute the Transfer Document; Other Documents

 Sign and date the transfer document. Make a copy for your records, for the recipient, and for the LLC.

  • The recipient typically receives the original transfer document.
  • The LLC may have additional documents that the recipient must sign in order to be admitted as a member.
  • State law may require the operating agreement and certificate of formation to be updated with the new member information.
  • The LLC may pass the costs associated with the transfer to the new member.

Conclusion

Making a proper transfer of membership interests requires the transferor to jump through a lot of hoops. The first step in the process is determining which hoops are required. Taking the time to properly transfer membership interests ensures that the recipient obtains full membership rights and protection.

 

We offer proactive business planning strategies. We help businesses draft thorough operating agreements that provide clear directions to the LLC members—to exercise membership interest transfers and other important member rights. We also assist existing LLC members who want to properly transfer their membership interests in the absence of a thorough operating agreement.  Contact us today to learn more about our business services.